The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III

[PDF] Unlimited ☆ The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III : by John D. Grainger [PDF] Unlimited ☆ The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III : by John D. Grainger - The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III, The Rise of the Seleukid Empire BC Seleukos I to Seleukos III The Seleukid kingdom was the largest state in the world for a century and between Alexander s death and the rise of Rome It was ruled for all that time by a succession of able kings but broke down tw

  • Title: The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III
  • Author: John D. Grainger
  • ISBN: 9781783030538
  • Page: 248
  • Format: Hardcover

[PDF] Unlimited ☆ The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III : by John D. Grainger, The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III, John D. Grainger, The Rise of the Seleukid Empire BC Seleukos I to Seleukos III The Seleukid kingdom was the largest state in the world for a century and between Alexander s death and the rise of Rome It was ruled for all that time by a succession of able kings but broke down twice before eventually succumbing to dynastic rivalries and simultaneous external invasions and internal grasps for independen

The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III

[PDF] Unlimited ☆ The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III : by John D. Grainger [PDF] Unlimited ☆ The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III : by John D. Grainger - The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III, The Rise of the Seleukid Empire BC Seleukos I to Seleukos III The Seleukid kingdom was the largest state in the world for a century and between Alexander s death and the rise of Rome It was ruled for all that time by a succession of able kings but broke down tw The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III

  • [PDF] Unlimited ☆ The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III : by John D. Grainger
    248John D. Grainger
The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III

462 thought on “The Rise of the Seleukid Empire (323-223 BC): Seleukos I to Seleukos III

  1. If you want a book about the early Seleukids you re going to be getting this one anyway, because what choice is there Fortunately this is a pretty good, fairly comprehensive one, that covers exactly what it says, the early Seleukids, with, naturally, the Antigonids and Ptolemies mentioned, because how could they not be It s clearly written and has good footnotes You know what I d like A biography of Phila, daughter of Antipater Failing that, I ll certainly be reading Grainger, because I seem to [...]


  2. Practically the only book out on this time period The author does a good job of dissecting the available sources logically This period and the Seleukids have always fascinated me and the book does not disappoint Macedonian Soap Opera for sure, the amount of historical back and forth, conniving, trickery, etc is amazing I eagerly await the final 2 books of the series I also enjoyed his previous work with the Roman Conquests series.


  3. Unusually for such an eminent power of antiquity, there has been a paucity of books about the Seleukids or Seleucids, if you prefer This is, apparently, a function of the dearth of source documentation, both absolute and relative.John D Grainger s The Rise of the Seleukid Empire is the first of a trilogy attempting to address this deficiency in the literature and provide a high level overview of the Empire s history Judging by its 2013 publication date and its extensive references, it gives the [...]


  4. Fascinating look at politics in the near East between Alexander the Great s demise and the start of the Seleucid and Ptolemy houses Since the same names are used over and over, and the turnover of rulers generals is so very rapid, it took a lot of flipping back and forth to keep track of Which one now to alleviate my confusion The model of government established was intriguing, and there were a couple items of personal drama that quite frankly I had hoped to find of, since my original reason f [...]


  5. Worth a readWorth a read, unfortunately the book ended earlier than I thought A good read over a period of which I had little knowledge I found the book reasonably easy to read and enjoyable Only complaint would the scarcity of maps, but this is a complaint of most books in ancient history.


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